NASA Successfully Completes Probe On Pluto

Tuesday, 18 Jul, 2017

According to New Horizons data released late previous year, "Pluto's Heart" may hold an exciting huge ocean of slushy water ice.

Using data from the New Horizons spacecraft and digital elevation models of both the planet and its largest moon, Charon, scientists were able to develop these awesome flyover movies.

New Horizons has moved on from Pluto and is now flying deeper into the Kuiper Belt, a vast area filled with icy bodies out beyond Neptune's orbit.

Lasting slightly over one minute, the Charon flyover video begins with a distant view, then comes closer, sweeping over Serenity Chasma, a deep, wide canyon.

From there, the flyby footage passes over Sputnik's western border with Cthulhu Macula, which is a dark, craters region located within the nearby highlands. The tour moves north past the rugged and fractured highlands of Voyager Terra and then turns southward over Pioneer Terra - which exhibits deep and wide pits - before concluding over the bladed terrain of Tartarus Dorsa in the far east of the encounter hemisphere.

Civil Rights Groups Join EPIC In Challenge To Election Commission
The commission has now backed off from that idea and assures us all that the data will be securely held on a White House site. Missouri Secretary of State Delbert Hosemann, a Republican , suggested that the commission, "go jump in the Gulf of Mexico".

The surface colors of Pluto and Charon also have been enhanced to bring out detail, NASA said.

A never-before-seen fly-by video of Pluto has been released by NASA using compiled data from the nearly $900m New Horizons mission.

On the two-year anniversary of the flyby, the team of scientists is uncovering a set of detailed, high-quality global maps of Pluto and Charon. "These new maps from the landmark exploration of Pluto by NASA's New Horizons mission in 2015 will help unravel these mysteries and are for everyone to enjoy".

"The complexity of the Pluto system-from its geology to its satellite system to its atmosphere-has been beyond our wildest imagination", said mission Principal Investigator Alan Stern of the Southwest Research Institute (SwRI).

The probe captured the first-ever close-up pictures after coming within 7,800 miles (12,550km) of the dwarf planet back in July 2015, providing us Earthlings with a whole new perspective of the icy rock at the edge of our solar system. The spacecraft's mission is set to continue with a look at a Kuiper Belt object called 2014 MU69 about 18 months from now.